VETzInsight

Safe and Toxic Garden Plant Images

July 3, 2018 (published)

Poisonous plants that can potentially kill your pet or cause serious damage:

Azalea
Contains “grayanotoxin” which causes cardiovascular collapse.
By Kurt Stüber [1] [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Castor Bean Plant
Causes convulsions, kidney failure, and rapid death.
By The original uploader was Geographer at English Wikipedia. [CC BY 1.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Castor Bean
The beans are commonly made into necklaces which are also extremely lethal if chewed up.
By H. Zell [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Cyclamen
Causes heart arrhythmias if the root/tuber is eaten in large quantities, otherwise just upset stomach.
By Mark Griffiths. [GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons.

Daffodil
Especially the bulb- Causes convulsions, tremors and heart arrhythmia.
By No machine-readable author provided. Pokrajac assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons.

Easter Lily
Causes kidney failure in cats.
By UpstateNYer. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Foxglove
Poisons the heart.
[CC BY-SA 3.0]

Oleander
Poisons the heart.
By Ian W. Fieggen. [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Sago Palm
Causes liver failure and interferes with blood clotting.
[Public Domain]

Star Gazer Lily
Other Day Lilies such as those shown above also cause kidney failure in cats.
By Tiffany825. [CC BY 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons

Tiger Lily
Other Day Lilies such as those shown above also cause kidney failure in cats.
By Cody Hough. [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons.

Toxic plants that are not dangerous, but may make your pet sick:

Aloe
Causes upset stomach, can also cause tremors.
By Andrew Massyn [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons.

Begonia
Oxalate crystals in the plant embed in the mouth causing pain and inflammation.
By KENPEI (KENPEI's photo). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.1 jp], via Wikimedia Commons.

Bird of Paradise
Upset stomach and drowsiness.
By Drakonfly [CC0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Bougainvillea
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Calla Lily
By Koshy Koshy from Faridabad, Haryana, India (Calla LilyUploaded by jkadavoor). [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Carnation
Causes upset stomach.
By FASTILY. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Chrysanthemum
Causes upset stomach, drooling, incoordination.
By Darren Swim (Relic38). [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons

Coleus
Causes vomiting/diarrhea either of which can be bloody.
By KENPEI (KENPEI's photo). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.1 jp], via Wikimedia Commons.

Cosmos
Can cause gastrointestinal upset.
By Anderson Mancini from Sao Paulo, Brazil (Orvalho). [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Dumb Cane
By Mokkie. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Elephant Ear
Causes intense burning of the mouth, vomiting.
By Photo by David J. Stang. [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Fleabane
Causes upset stomach.
By homeredwardprice [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Gardenia
Causes upset stomach and hives.
By Krzysztof Golik. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Martha Washington Geranium (maroon)
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Hibiscus
Causes upset stomach & appetite loss.
I, KENPEI [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons.

Hydrangea
Causes upset stomach.
Raul654. [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Iris
Causes upset stomach. Bulb is most toxic.
By Bob Gutowski. [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Kalanchoe
Causes gastrointestinal upset and rarely heart rhythm disturbance.
By Wildfeuer. [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], from Wikimedia Commons.

Mother-in-law’s Tongue
By Ks.mini. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Pansy
Causes gastrointestinal upset.
By Chris Combe from York, UK (YellowPansieCS). [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Peace Lily
Oxalate crystals in the plant embed in the mouth causing pain and inflammation.
By Christopher Hollis for Wdwic Pictures. [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons.

Pinks (Dianthus)
Causes upset stomach and dermatitis.
By Sethwoodworth. [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5], from Wikimedia Commons.

Plumbago
Causes contact dermatitis and makes skin more sensitive to sun exposure.
By Ανώνυμος Βικιπαιδιστής [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Poinsettia
Causes mouth irritation and upset stomach.
By http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/k7244-2.htm, Public Domain.

Primrose
Causes mild upset stomach.
[CC BY-SA 3.0]

Plants that are safe for your pet:

Alyssum
By HermannSchachner. [CC0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Blue Daisy
By Freefotopia. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Boston Fern
By Mokkie. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Bottle Brush Flower
Photo Courtesy Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Camellia
By Rasbak. [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Canna
By SKsiddhartthan. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)
Catnip was brought to America by early colonists and was considered to be a commercial crop. Numerous medicinal properties have been ascribed to catnip and it has been used in teas, soaks, and poultices. Today its uses are largely confined to feline entertainment as its active ingredient, cis-trans-nepetalactone, is a mild hallucinogen. Rubbing, rolling, and other merry-making actions are produced, though one should be careful as aggressive behavior is often made worse by catnip indulgence. Response to catnip is inherited genetically as a dominant trait which means that not all cats will be affected. Further, kittens under age 6-8 weeks are not able to respond. Catnip is felt to be a safe and non-addictive recreational drug for cats but there is some thinking that overdose can produce seizures. For this reason, it is best not used in cats with a history of seizures. Chronic exposure to catnip may cause an apparent loss of mental faculty and possibly personality change. Also, it is not a good idea to put catnip in a carrier or box for transportation as by the time the cat arrives, some unpleasant mental changes may be in progress making the cat more aggressive and more stressed than he/she would be had no hallucinogens been involved.
By Naturalstyle91. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Celosia Plumosa
By Digigalos. [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons.

Christmas Cactus
By Leo Michels - Own work. [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons.

Coreopsis
By KENPEI (KENPEI's photo). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.1 jp], via Wikimedia Commons.

Echevaria Succulents
By User: Introvert. [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], from Wikimedia Commons.

Gerber Daisy
By MChance666. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Gloxinia
By Vinayaraj. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Impatiens
By 4028mdk09. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Marigold
By Sarbast.T.Hameed. [GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Nasturtium
By Claire Pearcy. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Pampas Grass
By 4028mdk09. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Persian Violet
By Photo by David J. Stang. [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Petunia
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Polkadot Plant (aka Baby Tears)
By Agnieszka Kwiecien, Nova. [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Rose
By Anna reg. [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Snap Dragon
By Rameshng. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Spider Plant
By Mokkie. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Star Jasmine
By Mokkie. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Sunflower
By 3268zauber. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Sword Fern
By Mokkie. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Viola

Zinnia
By Reaperman. [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

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