VETzInsight

Safe and Toxic Garden Plant Images

July 3, 2018 (published) | July 9, 2020 (revised)

The flowers and plants listed here are typically the most common ones used in gardening. See more at the ASPCA 's Animal Poison Control Center.

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Poisonous plants that can potentially kill your pet or cause serious damage:

Azalea
Contains grayanotoxin, which causes cardiovascular collapse. Photo from Depositphotos

Castor Bean Plant and Beans
Castor bean plants and their beans cause convulsions, kidney failure, and rapid death. Photo by Depositphotos

Castor Beans
The brown castor beans, which are commonly made into necklaces, are also extremely lethal if chewed up. Photo by Depositphotos

Cyclamen
Causes heart arrhythmias if the root/tuber is eaten in large quantities, otherwise just upset stomach. Photo from Depositphotos

Daffodil
Daffodils, especially the bulb, causes convulsions, tremors and heart arrhythmia. Photo by Karen James/VIN.

Easter Lily
Causes kidney failure in cats. Photo by Depositphotos

Foxglove
Poisons the heart. Photo by Depositphotos

Oleander
Poisons the heart. Photo by Depositphotos

Sago Palm
Causes liver failure and interferes with blood clotting. Sago palms are often used as potted plants as well as planted outdoors. Photos by Depositphotos.

Star Gazer Lily
Photo from Depositphotos

Tiger Lily
Some tiger lilies have spots. Other daylilies as shown above also cause kidney failure in cats. Photo from Depositphotos

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Toxic plants that are not dangerous, but may make your pet sick:

Aloe Vera
Causes upset stomach, can also cause tremors. Photo by Depositphotos

Begonia
Oxalate crystals in the plant embed in the mouth causing pain and inflammation. Photo by Depositphotos

Bird of Paradise
Upset stomach and drowsiness. Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Bougainvillea
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Calla Lily
Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Carnation
Carnations cause an upset stomach. Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Chrysanthemum
Causes upset stomach, drooling, incoordination. Photos by Depositphotos.

Coleus
Causes vomiting/diarrhea either of which can be bloody. Photo by Depositphotos

Cosmos
Can cause gastrointestinal upset.
Photo by Depositphotos

Daisy
Signs include Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, incoordination, dermatitis.
Photo by Depositphotos

Dumb Cane
Photo by Depositphotos

Elephant Ear Plant
Causes intense burning of the mouth and vomiting.
Photo by Depositphotos

Fleabane
Causes upset stomach.
Photo by Depositphotos

Gardenia
Causes upset stomach and hives.
Photo by Depositphotos

Geranium (maroon)
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Hibiscus
Causes upset stomach & appetite loss.
Photo by Depositphotos

Hydrangea
Photo by Depositphotos

Iris
Causes upset stomach. The bulb is the most toxic part.
Photo by Depositphotos

Kalanchoe
Causes gastrointestinal upset and rarely heart rhythm disturbance.
Photo by Depositphotos

Mother-in-law's Tongue
Photo by Depositphotos

Pansy
Causes gastrointestinal upset.
Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Peace Lily
Photo by Depositphotos

Dianthus (also called Sweet William)
Dianthus causes upset stomach and dermatitis.
Photo by Depositphotos

Plumbago
Plumbago causes contact dermatitis and makes skin more sensitive to sun exposure.
Photo by Depositphotos

Poinsettia
Causes mouth irritation and upset stomach.
By http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/k7244-2.htm, Public Domain.

Primrose
Primrose causes mild upset stomach.
Photo by Depositphotos

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Plants that are safe for your pet:

Alyssum
Photo by Depositphotos

Blue Daisy
By Freefotopia. [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons.

Boston Fern
Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Bottle Brush Flower
Photo Courtesy Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Camelia
Photo by Depositphotos

Canna Lily
Photo by Depositphotos

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)
Photo by Depositphotos

Celosia plumosa
Photo courtesy Depositphotos

Christmas Cactus
Photo by Depositphotos

Coreopsis
Photo by Depositphotos

Echeveria Succulents
Photos by Depositphotos

Gerber Daisy
Photos by Depositphotos

Gloxinia
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Impatiens
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Marigolds
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Nasturtiums
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Pampas Grass
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Persian Violet
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Petunia
Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler

Polka Dot Plant
Can cause mild vomiting and diarrhea. Also called Measles Plant, Baby’s Tears, Freckle Face.
Photo couresty of Depositphotos

Roses
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Snapdragons
Photo courtesy of Depositphotos

Spider Plant
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Star Jasmine
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Sunflowers
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Sword Fern
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Violet
Courtesy of Depositphotos

Zinnia
Courtesy of Depositphotos

   


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