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ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

Equine veterinary education
Volume 34 | Issue 5 (May 2022)

Dentigerous cysts with exostosis of the temporal bone in horses – A new variant diagnosed by computed tomography

Equine Vet Educ. May 2022;34(5):e181-e186. 18 Refs
F Heun1, A Schwieder, F Hansmann, A Bienert-Zeit, M Hellige2
1 Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Hannover, Germany.; 2 maren.hellige@tiho-hannover.de

Author Abstract

The dentigerous cyst or temporal teratoma in horses is a well-known congenital malformation that occurs in the temporal region and usually contains dental tissue. This case report describes two horses with a previously unreported variant of the dentigerous cyst associated with an exostosis arising from the temporal bone. The principal clinical sign was a draining tract opening at the margin of the right pinna in both horses. There was no evidence of an ectopic tooth on the radiographs or at ultrasonographic examination. Computed tomography combined with positive contrast sinography of the draining tract revealed bone formation arising from the supramastoid crest of the right temporal bone extending towards a cyst-like structure but without direct connection in both cases. This bone formation was located at a site on the supramastoid crest, close to the external acoustic meatus, where ectopic teeth may also occur. Both cysts were removed surgically with a good long-term outcome.

Keywords

horse, temporal teratoma, dermoid cyst, temporal odontoma, heterotopic polyodontia

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Archives Highlights:
Dentigerous cysts with exostosis of the temporal bone in horses – A new variant diagnosed by computed tomography
The dentigerous cyst or temporal teratoma in horses is a well-known congenital malformation that occurs in the temporal region and usually contains dental tissue. This case report describes two horses with a previously unreported variant of the dentigerous cyst associated with an exostosis arising from the temporal bone.
Veterinary approach to the amphibian patient
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Joint involvement in canine visceral leishmaniasis: Orthopedic physical examination, radiographic and computed tomographic findings.
Of the 46 evaluated dogs, an overall of 91.3 % presented joint (carpal, tarsal, elbows, and stifle) abnormalities, observed on physical examination, radiography, and/or CT. In 67.3 % of the dogs, orthopedic examination showed no abnormalities. Among the 31 dogs with normal orthopedic examination, 61.3 % showed radiographic and CT findings suggestive of osteoarthritis, 25.8 % presented normal radiographs with abnormalities evidenced only on CT, while 12.9 % presented normal radiographs and CT imaging.
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