Front Page VSPN Message Boards Chat Library Continual Education Search MyVSPN - Coming Soon Help Frequently Asked Questions Send us Feedback! Go to VIN Industry Partners Go to VetQuest Go to Veterinary Partner Go to Y2Spay
 
Menu bar   Go to the VIN.com Portal
 

ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

Journal of comparative pathology
Volume 204 | Issue 0 (July 2023)

Cowpox in zoo and wild animals in the United Kingdom.

J Comp Pathol. July 2023;204(0):39 - 46.
Taiana Costa1, Mark F Stidworthy2, Rosina Ehmann3, Daniela Denk4, Ian Ashpole5, Gabby Drake6, Iuliana Maciuca7, Gudrun Zoeller8, Hermann Meyer9, Julian Chantrey10
1 School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Chester High Road, Neston, Liverpool CH64 7TE, UK.; 2 International Zoo Veterinary Group, Station House, Parkwood Street, Keighley BD21 4NQ, UK.; 3 Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology, Neuherbergstraße 11, 80937 Munich, Germany.; 4 International Zoo Veterinary Group, Station House, Parkwood Street, Keighley BD21 4NQ, UK.; 5 Chester Zoo, Upton-by-Chester, Chester CH2 1EU, UK.; 6 Chester Zoo, Upton-by-Chester, Chester CH2 1EU, UK.; 7 School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Chester High Road, Neston, Liverpool CH64 7TE, UK.; 8 Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology, Neuherbergstraße 11, 80937 Munich, Germany.; 9 Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology, Neuherbergstraße 11, 80937 Munich, Germany.; 10 Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Science (IVES), University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston CH64 7TE, UK. Electronic address: chantrey@liv.ac.uk.
Copyright © 2023 University of Liverpool, UK. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Cowpox virus is considered to be a re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and a public health threat due to increasing numbers of cases in humans and animals in Europe over the past decade, including within the United Kingdom (UK). We present epidemiological data and diagnostic features of 27 recent, naturally occurring cowpox cases in zoo and wild animals across the UK, including the first reports of cowpox in two snow leopards (Panthera uncia), a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), three Chilean pudus (Pudu puda), a Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) and a Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra), and the first reports of Orthopoxvirus infection in a lar gibbon (Hylobates lar), a Southern tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) and an aardvark (Orycteropus afer). This study provides a detailed overview of cowpox infections in a wide range of non-domestic animal species, presents a range of methods for diagnosis and demonstrates the value of retrospective analysis of pathology surveillance in revealing epidemiological links.

Keywords
Orthopoxvirus; cowpox; cowpox virus; wild animals; zoo animals;

Article Tools:
   Medline
   Email to me

Archives Highlights:
Delayed embryonic development or a long sperm survival in two mares-A registration conundrum.
Donor mares were inseminated with semen from one stallion during one oestrous cycle and semen from a different stallion on the subsequent oestrous cycle. Embryo(s) were collected 8?days after ovulation during the second oestrous cycle and transferred into synchronised recipient mares. Genetic testing was performed to determine parentage of the two foals. For both foals, DNA parentage testing excluded the second stallion as the genetic sire and confirmed that the first stallion, whose semen was inseminated on the previous oestrous cycle, was the actual genetic sire.
Use of surgical lasers in small animal dermatology
This article covers the basics of lasers, including discussion of both diode and CO2 lasers. It also discusses several skin diseases and/or conditions in which lasers are commonly used.
Intrathecal mepivacaine after general anesthesia is an effective method of equine euthanasia when compared to intravenous pentobarbital.
Previous publications have shown that the risk of scavenger intoxication through consumption of the carcass is low with an intrathecal lidocaine method. In horses euthanized with intravenous pentobarbital, sodium pentobarbital residues were found in compost pile samples up to 367 days after euthanasia with no decrease in concentration, despite complete degradation of soft tissues.
Gender discrimination of veterinary students and its impact on career aspiration: A mixed methods approach.
Gender discrimination in a veterinary setting had been experienced by 34% of respondents, the majority (77%) on animal husbandry placements. Female students were more likely to report that their experiences of gender discrimination affected their career aspirations.
Wavy changes in the whiskers of domestic cats are correlated with feline leukemia virus infection.
The prevalence of wavy whiskers (WW) was significantly correlated with FeLV antigen positivity in the blood. Of 56 cases with WW, 50 (89.3%) were serologically positive for FeLV. The significant association between WW and serological FeLV positivity was also confirmed by multivariate analysis. In WW, narrowing, degeneration, and tearing of the hair medulla were observed. Mild infiltration of mononuclear cells in the tissues, but no degeneration or necrosis, was found. By immunohistochemistry, FeLV antigens (p27, gp70, and p15E) were observed in various epithelial cells including the sinus hair follicular epithelium of the whisker.

Back Print Save Bookmark in my Browser Email this article to me. Top of Page. VSPN AOW : Cowpox in zoo and wild an...
Contact Us