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ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

BMC veterinary research
Volume 17 | Issue 1 (August 2021)

Effect of age, sex, and body size on the blood biochemistry and physiological constants of dogs from 4 wk. to > 52 wk. of age.

BMC Vet Res. August 2021;17(1):265.
Ana Luisa Montoya Navarrete1, Teódulo Quezada-Tristán2, Samuel Lozano Santillán3, Raúl Ortiz-Martínez4, Arturo Gerardo Valdivia-Flores5, Lizbeth Martínez-Martínez6, María Carolina De Luna López7
1 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.; 2 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico. teodulo.quezada@edu.uaa.mx.; 3 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.; 4 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.; 5 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.; 6 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.; 7 Department of Veterinary Clinic, Autonomous University of Aguascalientes, La Posta Zootécnica, Jesús María, C.P.20908, Aguascalientes, Mexico.
© 2021. The Author(s).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:Blood biochemistry and reference intervals help to differentiate between healthy and ill dogs as well as to provide information for the prognosis, evaluation, and monitoring; however, these intervals are often obtained from adult animals. It is essential to understand that puppies and adults are physiologically different, which justifies the need to obtain age-specific biochemical reference intervals. The aim of this research was to assess the potential effect of age, sex, body size, and their interaction on routine biochemical analytes and physiological constants (body temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate). To carry out the research, we selected 197 healthy dogs of both sexes and different body sizes (small, medium and large) classified by age: group I (4-8 wk), group II (9-24 wk), group III (25-52 wk), and group IV (> 52 wk). The biochemical analysis included the measurement of the enzymatic activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and the concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides, total proteins, albumin, globulins, glucose, urea, and creatinine. Statistical analyses used analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a general linear model (GLM), which allows the comparison of multiple factors at two or more levels (p < 0.05).
RESULTS:The results of this study showed that ALT, total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, creatinine, and body temperature levels were lower in puppies than in adult dogs of group IV (p < 0.05), while the enzymatic activity of ALP, LDH, glucose concentration, and heart rate were higher. Whereas sex, body size and the interaction did not show a significant effect (p > 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:Some biochemical components are influenced by age. For this reason, this manuscript contributes with additional data for the clinical interpretation of blood biochemical results in puppies.

Keywords
Blood chemistry; Clinical pathology; Physiological constants; Puppies; Reference intervals;

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