Orbital Fat Prolapse in a Persian Cat
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2004
JL Laus1, JP Duque Ortiz1, FAM Vicenti1, CBS Lisbão1, JL Laus1, JP Duque Ortiz2, FAM Vicenti2, APM Carneiro2 , CBS Lisbão3
DVM, PhD Professor of Veterinary College, Department of Medicine and Surgery, São Paulo State University, FCAV/UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil1; Graduate Student of Veterinary College, São Paulo State University, FCAV/UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil2; Student of Veterinary College, São Paulo State University, FCAV/UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil3

A two and a half-year-old female Persian cat was presented with a history of bilateral chronic ocular discharge. The routine ophthalmic examination was performed, including Schirmer tear test, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy, applanation tonometry and Jones test. A fine needle aspiration cytology of a mass underneath the right eye´s bulbar conjunctiva was performed. Epiphora, bilateral mucous ocular discharge and a volume increase in the bulbar conjunctiva on the dorsolateral quadrant of the right eye were observed. No alterations were found in the anterior and posterior chambers. The intraocular pressure values were within the normal range. The Jones test identified bilateral nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass found in the right eye dorsolateral quadrant showed adipose tissue. The ophthalmic examinations and the fine needle aspiration cytology results showing the presence of adipose tissue in the right eye dorsolateral quadrant indicated orbital fat prolapse. The animal was reexamined monthly for three months, meanwhile the lesions remained unchanged despite the treatment's absence. Conclusion, orbital fat prolapse may occur in cats. The diagnosis must be confirmed by fine needle aspiration cytology or lesion histopathology (Spiess & Hakanson, 1998). Therapeutic measures may be applied, but are not compulsory due to the absence of pain or further complications (Dimison, 1993).

References

1.  Spiess, B. M.; Hakanson,, N. W. Diseases of the canine dog. In: GELATT, K. N. Veterinary Ophthalmology. Philadelphia: Lippincoot Williams & Wilkins, 1998. cap. 13, p. 511-533

2.  Dimison, W. G. Sialadenitis associated with periorbital disease in a dog. J Am Vet Assoc, n. 202. p. 1983-1985, 1993.

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

J. L. Laus, DVM, PhD
Professor of Veterinary College, Department of Medicine and Surgery
São Paulo State University


MAIN : Abstracts : Orbital Fat Prolapse in a Cat
Powered By VIN

Friendly Reminder to Our Colleagues: Use of VIN content is limited to personal reference by VIN members. No portion of any VIN content may be copied or distributed without the expressed written permission of VIN.

Clinicians are reminded that you are ultimately responsible for the care of your patients. Any content that concerns treatment of your cases should be deemed recommendations by colleagues for you to consider in your case management decisions. Dosages should be confirmed prior to dispensing medications unfamiliar to you. To better understand the origins and logic behind these policies, and to discuss them with your colleagues, click here.

Images posted by VIN community members and displayed via VIN should not be considered of diagnostic quality and the ultimate interpretation of the images lies with the attending clinician. Suggestions, discussions and interpretation related to posted images are only that -- suggestions and recommendations which may be based upon less than diagnostic quality information.

CONTACT US

777 W. Covell Blvd., Davis, CA 95616

vingram@vin.com

PHONE

  • Toll Free: 800-700-4636
  • From UK: 01-45-222-6154
  • From anywhere: (1)-530-756-4881
  • From Australia: 02-6145-2357
SAID=27