Epidemiology of Digestive Parasitism Pound Dogs From Transylvania (Romania)
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2004
Lefkaditis M., Cozma V., Achelaritei D., Vigh I., Mihalca A.D.

Dogs represent an important reservoir for some zoonosis. Among, digestive parasitosis of dog, many can be included in this category. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of digestive parasites in pound dogs from two major cities of Romania.

The studies were performed from February 2003 to May 2003, in two groups of dogs. In the first group included stray dogs from the city Cluj-Napoca, collected at the City Pound (36 feces samples- 18 from male and 18 from female dogs-6 dogs under 1 year, 6 dogs between 1 to 3 years and 6 dogs up to 3 years of age-per sex). In the second group included stray dogs from the city of Oradea, collected at the City Pound (72 feces samples- 36 from male and 36 from female dogs- 12 dogs under 1 year, 12 dogs between 1 to 3 years and 12 dogs up to 3 years of age-per sex).

Parasitological examination consisted of classical methods. McMaster, Willis, and Blagg.

In the first group, the examination of the fecal samples shown in percentage 36.11% monospecific infestation and 61.11% polispecific infestation. In the second group the percentages were 40.24% and 45.83% respectively.

The recorded results from the first group shown the prevalence of each parasite specie as follow: Isospora spp 27.77%, Sarcocystis spp 11.11%, Toxocara canis 30.55%, Ancylostomidae spp 52.77%, Trichuris vulpis 33.33%, Taenidaespp 13.88%, and Strongyloides tercoralis2.77%.

The recorded results from the second group, shown the prevalence of each parasite specie as follow: Isospora spp12.50%, Sarcocystis spp 2.77%, Toxocara canis 27.77%, Ancylostomidae sp 50.00%, Trichuris vulpis 41.66%, Taenidaespp 8.33%, and Strongyloides stercoralis 2.77%.

The values for each parasite species, obtained in the two cities are similar. As expected, Toxocara canis infestation was higher in young dogs (under 1 year of age), while Ancylostomidae spp, Trichuris vulpis and Strongyloides stercoralis were more prevalent in mature dogs (up to1year of age).

Many authors, in Romania as well in other countries, studied the incidence of intestinal parasite species in stray dogs. The values are similar with the results obtained by other authors for Isospora spp, Sarcocystis spp and Strongyloides but were higher for the other species: Ancylostomidae spp, Toxocara canis and Taenidae spp (Suteu E, Cozma V 1998, Vanparijs et al., 1991,Epe et al., 1993, Oliveira-Sequeira et al., 2002, Haralabidis S, 2003).

These results prove that the incidence of intestinal parasites and the potential of their zoonotic transmission carried by dogs are very high in stray dogs from Romania.

References

1.  Suteu E., Cozma V., - 1998, Bolile parazitare la animale domestice, Editura Ceres, Bucuresti

2.  Vanparijs O., Herman L., van der Flaes L. 1991, Helminth and protozoan parasites in dogs and cats in Belgium, Veterinary Parasitology 38(1): 67-73

3.  Haralabidis S. T. - 2003, Parasitic diseases of the animals and human. University Studio Press. Thessaloniki.

Speaker Information
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M. A. Lefkaditis, Veterinarian
Thessaloniki, Greece


MAIN : Abstracts : Epidemiology of Digestive Parasitism
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