Serologic Study of Toxoplasmosis in Cats from Iran
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2004
Jamshidi Sh, Loppin MR, Bokaie S

Introduction

Toxoplasmosis is one the most important zoonotic disease that is transmitted by cats. The pregnant women and people with suppression of immune system, especially those living with HIV/AIDS are more susceptible to Toxoplasmosis. This lead to, the public health care service provider in the society educate people about this disease to minimize exposure and its affect on people.

Toxoplasmosis is caused by a protozoan parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite multiplies in the intestines of he cat and is shed in their feces. The parasitologic diagnosis of the disease has some difficulties due to periodic shedding of the oocysts in feces and their relative small size.

Materials and methods

In this experiment, as a first study in Iran ELISA method was used to determine the amount of IgM and IgG antibodies in the three different populations of the cat's blood samples including:

 Domestic cats that were referred to small animal hospital, veterinary faculty of Tehran University.

 Urban Stray Cats that were captured from different locations of Tehran (capital city of Iran).

 Rural stray cats that were captured from villages surrounding Tehran.

 Serum IgG and IgM responses were studied by ELISA kits that were setup by parasitology department of Colorado University. The analytical studies were performed using Chi square method.

Results

Based on results of the study 88.8 % of the animals had IgG titer against Toxoplasma gondii. IgM responses were also positive in 87.3% of the cats and in 83.6% both IgG and IgM were positive simultaneously.

There wasn't any significant difference between stray and domestic animals from the site of their response to toxoplasmosis and many of them were positive serologically. Furthermore the results of the study showed a direct relationship between age and anti-toxoplasmal titers. It means that as age of cat increases, there is more chance for cat to become infected with the toxoplasma organism. Anti-toxoplasma titers were different in the animals and in some of them titers as high as 1/32768 was measured.

Conclusion

In conclusion many of the animals in the study showed serological responsiveness against toxoplasmosis. It doesn't mean that they are sick or active phase of oocyst shedding are happening on them, but it may show the importance of their hygienic role in contamination of environment because most of these cats had excreted oocysts sometimes in their life and contaminated the environment. On the other hand these cats have a lower risk in shedding of oocyst because of their induced immunity in relation with past contamination.

References

1.  Ettinger SJ, Feldman EC (2000) : Text book of veterinary internal medicine ( 5th edition). W. B. Saunders company. pp 408-417

2.  Loppin MR (1996): Feline toxoplasmosis : Interpretation of diagnostic test results. Semin Vet Med Surg 11:154

3.  Green CE ( 1998): Infectious disease of the dog and cat ( second edition). W. B. Saunders company. pp 492-509

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

Sh Jamshidi


MAIN : Abstracts : Serologic Study of Toxoplasmosis
Powered By VIN

Friendly Reminder to Our Colleagues: Use of VIN content is limited to personal reference by VIN members. No portion of any VIN content may be copied or distributed without the expressed written permission of VIN.

Clinicians are reminded that you are ultimately responsible for the care of your patients. Any content that concerns treatment of your cases should be deemed recommendations by colleagues for you to consider in your case management decisions. Dosages should be confirmed prior to dispensing medications unfamiliar to you. To better understand the origins and logic behind these policies, and to discuss them with your colleagues, click here.

Images posted by VIN community members and displayed via VIN should not be considered of diagnostic quality and the ultimate interpretation of the images lies with the attending clinician. Suggestions, discussions and interpretation related to posted images are only that -- suggestions and recommendations which may be based upon less than diagnostic quality information.

CONTACT US

777 W. Covell Blvd., Davis, CA 95616

vingram@vin.com

PHONE

  • Toll Free: 800-700-4636
  • From UK: 01-45-222-6154
  • From anywhere: (1)-530-756-4881
  • From Australia: 02-6145-2357
SAID=27