What is Primary Mode of Haemobartonella Transmission in Iranian Cats?
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2004
Ali Shabestari Asl, Ghafoor Mosavi, Daryoush Shirani, Shahram Jamshidi

Introduction

Haemobartonella is a genus of gram-negative, nonacid-fast, epicellular rickettsial parasites of erythrocytes, currently classified in the family Anaplasmataceae. In stained blood films, H. felis appear as small, blue-staining cocci, rings, and rods. Organisms are approximately 0.5 µm in diameter and attached to the surface of the erythrocytes. Parasitized erythrocytes, lose the normal shape and become spherocytes.

H. felis infection has been transmitted by IP and IV injections and oral administration of infected blood. Saliva and urine are not believed to be infective. Dissemination of infection by blood- sucking arthropods is considered to be primary mode of transmission but has not been established. Haemobartonella can be transmitted from female cats to their new born offspring without presence of arthropods (in utero, during parturition, or via nursing). Iatrogenic transmission can occur by blood transfusion.

The severity of disease varies from mild to life threatening disease. Haemobartonellosis have four phase of disease ( i.e. Preparasitemic, Acute, Recovery, and Carrier phase). Parasites appear in the blood in a cyclic manner.

Some erythrocyte damage may be caused directly by parasites, but immune-mediated injuries appears to be more important. The anemia occurs primarily as a result of extravascular erythrophagocytosis by macrophage in the spleen, live, lungs, and bone marrow.

Case history

In my country, cats are often outdoors, and hence, they predispose to a variety of transmissible diseases. Many cats infected with this organism are asymptomatic and others show depression, weakness, anorexia, weight loss, and pale mucous membrane. In 12 outdoor cats, that presented to our clinic with signs of H. felis infections, we can't detect any arthropods infestation. Cats had fluctuant PCV and jaundice.

With attention to the H. felis transmissions, contamination of oral with infected bloods seems to be the major method of transmission. Because we never found any arthropods, and iatrogenic transmission (blood transfusion) wasn't detected. Further more, no maternal transmission were seen because all of cats was matured.

References

1.  Helmiths, Arthropods, and Protozoa of Domestic animals", E. J. L. Soulsby, (Bailliere Tindall); 1995.

2.  Infectious disease of dogs and cats, Craig E. Green, (W B Saunders); 2nd edition, 1998.

3.  small animal internal medicine, Stephen.J. Ettinger, Edward C. Feldman, (W B Saunders); 5th edition, 2000

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

Ali Shabestari Asl


MAIN : Abstracts : Haemobartonella Transmission in Iranian Cats
Powered By VIN

Friendly Reminder to Our Colleagues: Use of VIN content is limited to personal reference by VIN members. No portion of any VIN content may be copied or distributed without the expressed written permission of VIN.

Clinicians are reminded that you are ultimately responsible for the care of your patients. Any content that concerns treatment of your cases should be deemed recommendations by colleagues for you to consider in your case management decisions. Dosages should be confirmed prior to dispensing medications unfamiliar to you. To better understand the origins and logic behind these policies, and to discuss them with your colleagues, click here.

Images posted by VIN community members and displayed via VIN should not be considered of diagnostic quality and the ultimate interpretation of the images lies with the attending clinician. Suggestions, discussions and interpretation related to posted images are only that -- suggestions and recommendations which may be based upon less than diagnostic quality information.

CONTACT US

777 W. Covell Blvd., Davis, CA 95616

vingram@vin.com

PHONE

  • Toll Free: 800-700-4636
  • From UK: 01-45-222-6154
  • From anywhere: (1)-530-756-4881
  • From Australia: 02-6145-2357
SAID=27