Burn Wounds Management with Occlusive Dressing Granuflex IB Dogs
WSAVA 2002 Congress
*Zbigniew Adamiak, Wojciech Brzeski
*Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, ul. Oczapowskiego 14
Olsztyn-Kortowo, Warminsko-Mazurskie, PL
zbigniew.adamiak@wp.pl

OBJECTIVES

Moist conditions have been long recognised as the optimal for healing skin wounds. Many wounds in tissues other than skin heal normally under moist conditions including wounds in the oral cavity. Biologically, moist conditions under occlusive dressings are associated with accelerated healing through faster epithelial resurfacing, stimulated blood vessel growth.

The aim of this study was to clinically evaluate using of hydrocolloid dressings-Granuflex in treatment of burn wounds.

MATERIALS

15 dogs were treated with Granuflex hydrocolloid dressing (ConvaTec Limited, Deeside, UK) in which the regions of soft tissue burn wounds were located on back, chest, and limbs. Prior to dressing, the area surrounding the wound was debrided, cleansed and lavaged with physiological saline. Granuflex was applied with a 2-3 cm margin of intact skin surrounding the wound. Dressings on the limbs, chest, and back were additionally fixed by net dressing. Granuflex was changed once a day. No topical antibiotics were applied. In all dogs a systemic antibiotics Amoxicillin (Betamox, Scanvet) was given for 10-14 days. During the period of treatment, the skin viability was assessed.

RESULTS

15 dogs were presented with burn wounds. The average skin loss was 10/10 cm. The mean period of treatment was 10 weeks. The mean number of dressing changes during wound healing period decreased from one a day to one every second day. In the treated dogs a little or no discomfort during granuflex wearing was observed. Dressing changes were accepted by dogs and easy to performed. None of dogs developed inflammation or hyperemia after Granuflex application.

CONCLUSION

Granuflex dressings offer many advantages. It has ability to remove excess exudate and toxic components, maintain high humidity at the burn wound site, and allow gaseous exchange. It provide thermal insulation, help with the protection from secondary infection, be free from contamination, and allow for removal without pain and trauma during dressing changes.

Speaker Information
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WOJCIECH BRZESKI
Department of Surgery

ZBIGNIEW ADAMIAK
Departmet of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
ul. Oczapowskiego 14
Olsztyn-Kortowo, warminsko-mazurskie 10-957 PL


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