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ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice
Volume 47 | Issue 1 (January 2017)

Lymphoid Neoplasia: Correlations Between Morphology and Flow Cytometry.

Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. January 2017;47(1):53-70.
Emily D Rout1, Paul R Avery2
1 Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 314-4 Diagnostic Medicine Center, 200 West Lake Street, 1644 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1644, USA.; 2 Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 309 Diagnostic Medicine Center, 200 West Lake Street, 1644 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1644, USA. Electronic address: paul.avery@colostate.edu.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Cytology is commonly used to diagnose lymphoma and leukemia. Frequently, a diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease can be obtained via cytology, and some of the common subtypes of canine lymphoma and leukemia can have characteristic cytologic features. Flow cytometry is a critical tool in the objective diagnosis and further characterization of lymphoma and leukemia. Features of the immunophenotype, such as expression of certain cell surface proteins or cell size, can provide important prognostic information. This review describes the cytologic features, flow cytometry immunophenotype, and immunophenotypic prognostic information for 6 major types of canine lymphoma and leukemia.

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