Removing Salivary Gland Cyst in Boa constrictor
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2015
F. Amelia; D. Noviana; M.M. Fachrudin
Surgery and Radiology, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia

Introduction

A Boa constrictor had been regurgitating its food for 6 months. A supple lump was found on the ventrolateral side of its neck. Radiological examination showed a 2,5 x 1 cm radio opaque mass; meanwhile, the ultrasound found a fluid-filled mass with a diameter of 1,9 cm. The mass was suspected to be a salivary gland cyst.

Objective

This surgery aims to remove the salivary gland cyst of the snake.

Methods

The snake was induced by using 0,4 ml 10% ketamine HCl IM. A 5-ml syringe was used as mouth gage and was placed on the base of the jaw. A 1% lidocaine was sprayed into the epiglottis area and a modified endotracheal tube was used. The snake was immobilized in a lateral position using a half-open anaesthetic system with assisted ventilation and a mixture of isoflurane and oxygen. The operated area was sterilized using 70% alcohol and 3% Iodium tinctures then injected with 3% lidocaine. The incision was made 2 cm on the lateral of the neck, behind the left mandible. The cysts were localized and removed. A 50.000 IU penicillin G dropped prior to subcutaneous sutures. Flushing was done using 0,45% physiological saline. The postoperative therapy given were 0,24 ml oxytetracycline and 0,08 ml ketoprofen IM once every 2 days for 2 weeks.

Result

The removal of salivary gland cysts was successfully done. The snake shows wound healing within 14 days.

Conclusion

Surgical removal of cysts on the snake can be done with a modified endotracheal tube and isoflurane for maintenance anesthesia as an option.

  

Speaker Information
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F. Amelia
Surgery and Radiology
Bogor Agricultural University
Bogor, Indonesia


MAIN : Exotics : Salivary Gland Cyst in Boa constrictor
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