What's Your Diagnosis (Liver/Pancreas)?
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2014
David C. Twedt1, DVM, DACVIM; Jörg M. Steiner2, Dr.med.vet., PhD, DACVIM, DECVIM-CA, AGAF
1Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA; 2Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Case 1. The Normal Dog with Abnormal Liver Enzymes

Hattie is a 6-year-old female spayed mixed-breed terrier-type dog weighing 9 kg that was presented for elevations in liver enzyme activities. Approximately 1 month earlier, Hattie was stepped on by the owner's horse and was acutely lame in the right rear leg. The owner's veterinarian examined Hattie and diagnosed a partial tear in the right anterior cruciate ligament. The treatment plan was to limit exercise and prescribe an NSAID. Prior to treatment, however, a CBC and biochemical profile were performed. The following abnormalities were identified:

Test

Value

Normal

ALT

479

< 110 IU/L

AST

69

< 50 IU/L

ALP

535

< 140 IU/L

NSAID therapy was not given and a joint supplement was prescribed instead. Hattie was reported to be in good health prior to the lameness episode and was on no other medications. The owners were advised to obtain a second opinion on the abnormal liver enzymes.

At the time of your examination the owner felt Hattie was normal. There was no lameness identified and a complete physical exam was unremarkable. Repeat laboratory testing (1 month later) had the following abnormalities:

Test

Value

Normal

ALT

732

< 110 IU/L

AST

94

< 50 IU/L

ALP

649

< 140 IU/L

GGT

88

< 9 IU/L

The owner agreed to a further evaluation of Hattie.

Questions

 What are your differentials for elevated liver enzyme activities?

 What additional diagnostics or treatment would you consider?

Case 2. The Cat That's Losing Weight

Tiger is a 10-year-old male castrated domestic Shorthair cat with a history of weight loss over the last month from 3.0 kg down to 2.4 kg. The cat is also partially anorectic. Upon presentation the cat is alert and responsive, but has dry mucous membranes and a decreased skin turgor. Body temperature is 38.4°C, heart rate is 144 beats per minute, and the respiratory rate is 44 breaths per minute. Body condition score is judged to be a 2/9.

The initial problem list includes 3 problems:

1.  Weight loss

2.  Anorexia

3.  Mild dehydration (approximately 5%)

The owner agrees to a full clinical evaluation of Tiger.

Questions

 What are the possible causes of weight loss in Tiger?

 What are the possible causes of anorexia in Tiger?

 What are the possible causes of the mild dehydration in Tiger?

 Would you want to address Tiger's mild dehydration and, if so, how?

  

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

Jörg M. Steiner, DrMedVet, PhD, DACVIM, DECVIM-CA, AGAF
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX, USA

David C. Twedt, DVM, DACVIM
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO, USA


MAIN : GI - Pancreas and Liver : What's Your Diagnosis 1
Powered By VIN

CONTACT US

777 W. Covell Blvd., Davis, CA 95616

mailto:vingram@vin.com

PHONE

  • Toll Free: 800-700-4636
  • From UK: 01-45-222-6154
  • From anywhere: (1)-530-756-4881
  • From Australia: 02-6145-2357
SAID=27