Relationship Between Serum FPLI and Triglyceride Concentrations in Cats
ACVIM 2008
J.M. Steiner; K.M. Aicher; J.S. Suchodolski; P.G. Xenoulis
Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Texas A&M University
College Station, TX, USA

Hypertriglyceridemia has been reported as a risk factor for pancreatitis in both humans and dogs. Serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) concentration has been reported to be a sensitive and specific marker for pancreatitis in cats. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between serum fPLI and triglyceride concentrations in cats.

Serum samples from 279 cats were used for this study. Serum fPLI concentration (reference range: 2.9-6.0 µg/L) was measured in all serum samples by an in-house radioimmunoassay. Serum triglyceride concentration (reference range: 25-133 mg/dL) was measured using an automated serum chemistry analyzer. Possible correlation between serum fPLI and triglyceride concentrations was evaluated using a Spearman test. The median serum fPLI concentration was compared between cats with a normal serum triglyceride concentration, those with an increased serum triglyceride concentration, and also those with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 500 mg/dL). The proportion of cats with a serum fPLI concentration above the reference range or the cut-off value for pancreatitis (12 µg/L) was compared between cats with normal serum triglyceride concentrations and those with increased serum triglyceride concentrations.

Forty-six cats (16.5%) had an increased serum triglyceride concentration (median: 209 mg/dL; range: 134-2,147 mg/dL), but only 6 cats had severe hypertriglyceridemia. There was no significant correlation between serum fPLI and triglyceride concentrations (Spearman r = 0.1085; p-value = 0.0703). The median serum fPLI concentration was not significantly different between cats with an increased serum triglyceride concentration (68.3 µg/L) and cats with a normal serum triglyceride concentration (56.8 µg/L; p-value = 0.0557). Median serum fPLI concentration in the 6 cats with severe hypertriglyceridemia (164.6 µg/L) was not significantly higher than in cats with a normal serum triglyceride concentration (56.8 µg/L; p-value = 0.090). Also, the proportion of cats with a serum fPLI concentration above the upper limit of the reference range or the cut-off value for pancreatitis was not significantly higher in hypertriglyceridemic cats than in cats with normal serum triglyceride concentrations (p-values = 0.4368 and 0.1078, respectively).

Several cats with hypertriglyceridemia were identified in this study, but only 6 cats had a severely increased serum triglyceride concentration. In this study none of the parameters assessing the relationship of serum fPLI and triglyceride concentrations reached statistical significance. However, the median serum fPLI concentration was higher, albeit not significantly so, in cats with hypertriglyceridemia or severe hypertriglyceridemia than in cats with normal serum triglyceride concentrations. While this study did not show hypertriglyceridemia to be a risk factor for pancreatitis in cats, further studies are needed to confirm these results.

Speaker Information
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Joerg Steiner


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