Dexmedetomidine as a Preanesthetic Prior to Propofol- or Thiopental-Isoflurane Anesthesia in Dogs
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2007
Brett C. McKusick, DVM, MS, PhD; John C. Aspegrén, MSc; Suvi K. Tuomikoski, MSc; Charles E. Short1, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVA
Orion Corporation Orion Pharma, Clinical Research and Development, Turku, Finland; 1Professor Emeritus, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Background

Dexmedetomidine, the d-enantiomer of medetomidine, is the most specific and selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist approved for veterinarians.

Aims

To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine preanesthesia for elective canine veterinary procedures.

Methods

Ninety-six clinically healthy dogs were studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical study with 6 groups of 16 dogs: 0 (placebo), 125 or 375 mcg/m2 of dexmedetomidine (D) was administered intramuscularly 20 minutes prior to intravenous propofol or thiopental induction and isoflurane maintenance. Assessments included pre-induction sedation score (SED; 0-10), dose of induction drug (IND), isoflurane concentration (ISO), number of animals observed with clinically significant (score >2) postoperative pain (PAIN; 0-9). Cardiorespiratory data were collected before treatment, during the procedure and for 180 minutes post-procedure and adverse events (AE) were recorded. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Chi-square tests.

Results

 

Propofol

Thiopental

 

D0

D125

D375

D0

D125

D375

SED, median

0b

3ab

5a

0b

3ab

5a

IND, mg/kg

5.4±1.8a

3.1±1.4ab

2.7±1.6b

17.5±2.7a

12.3±4.2b

7.4±3.9c

ISO, %

2.9±0.8a

1.8±0.6b

1.1±0.3c

2.4±0.6a

1.6±0.7b

1.1±0.3b

PAIN, n

5a

2ab

0b

6a

0b

0b

AE, n

6

6

5

4

6

5

a,b,c D groups differ (P < 0.05) within propofol and thiopental.

D125 or D375 resulted in dose-dependent preoperative sedation, 30-58% less propofol or thiopental required for induction, less ISO for anesthetic maintenance, and less PAIN than D0. AE was similar between groups and primarily included vomiting (n=19) or transitory arrhythmia and bradycardia (n=6).

Conclusion

Dexmedetomidine appears to be an effective and safe preanesthetic for elective canine procedures.

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

Brett McKusick
Orion Corporation
Finland


MAIN : Abstracts - Poster : Dexmedetomidine & Propofol
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