Dietary Protein Intake Influences Gut Health in Dogs
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2007
Wendy Brown1; Andrew Redman2; John Pluske3
1UNE (University of New England) NSW, Australia; 2Masterfoods ANZ Petcare; 3Murdoch University, Australia

Background

Negative effects on gut health have been reported in dogs fed meat-based diets; however, these diets were often higher in crude protein (CP) content.

Aim

To differentiate the effects of protein level and protein source on specific indicators of gut health in dogs.

Methods

Six experimental extruded diets were fed to dogs (n = 8). Meat-based and meat-free diets were compared at three levels of CP (16%, 24% and 32%). Using a 2-period cross-over design, both the meat-based and the meat-free diet of the same CP level were tested in each dog. The primary source of protein was maize gluten and soy meal in the meat-free diets, and poultry meal in the meat-based diets. All diets met AAFCO nutrient requirements.

Results

Faecal concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids increased (P < 0.05) whilst Lactobacillus counts decreased (P < 0.05) as dietary CP levels increased (R2 = 0.10). Faecal amines increased (P < 0.01) with increasing CP levels (R2 = 0.38) for the meat-based diets only.

Conclusions

Increasing dietary CP intake had a negative effect on the markers of intestinal health measured in our experiment, whereas source of protein had no significant effect. Diets of higher CP content are intended for dogs with higher CP requirements (e.g., growing and exercising dogs). It is important to feed dogs diets designed for their specific needs, as CP ingested in excess of requirements may have a negative effect on animal health.

Speaker Information
(click the speaker's name to view other papers and abstracts submitted by this speaker)

Wendy Brown
UNE (University of New England)
NSW, Australia


MAIN : Abstracts - Poster : Dietary Protein Intake
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