Front Page VSPN Message Boards Chat Library Continual Education Search MyVSPN - Coming Soon Help Frequently Asked Questions Send us Feedback! Go to VIN Industry Partners Go to VetQuest Go to Veterinary Partner Go to Y2Spay
 
Menu bar   Go to the VIN.com Portal
 

ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

Dental traumatology : official publication of International Association for Dental Traumatology

Head and dental injuries among farriers and hoof care practitioners: A nationwide survey in Switzerland.

Dent Traumatol. February 2023;39(1):38 - 43.
Yvonne Fuhrer1, Florin Eggmann2, Elisabeth Reichardt3, Andreas Filippi4
1 Department of Oral Surgery, University Center for Dental Medicine Basel UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.; 2 Department of Periodontology, Endodontology and Cariology, University Center for Dental Medicine UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.; 3 Department of Pediatric Oral Health and Orthodontics, University Center for Dental Medicine Basel UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.; 4 Department of Oral Surgery, University Center for Dental Medicine Basel UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:There is a paucity of evidence on injuries sustained by farriers and hoof care practitioners, two professions exposed to unique occupational hazards. The aim of this study was to collect and examine data on occupational head/face and dental injuries among farriers and hoof care practitioners in a nationwide survey in Switzerland.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:Data on occupational head/face and dental injuries were gathered in a questionnaire-based, voluntary survey, which was mailed to all farriers and hoof care practitioners in Switzerland. The statistical analysis comprised multiple regressions with a nested design (α = 0.05).
RESULTS:The survey included 278 respondents (response rate of 78.1%). Head/face injuries were more frequently reported by farriers than hoof care practitioners (60.6% and 20.7%, respectively). Among full-time workers, farriers had a higher chance of an occupational head/face injury compared with hoof care practitioners (p = .007). The rate of dental injuries, mainly related to a horse kick, was 11.1% and 1.9% among farriers and hoof care practitioners, respectively. Negligence in wearing mandatory eye protection was reported by 37.5% of respondents.
CONCLUSIONS:Farriery and hoof care management entail a significant risk of occupational head/face and dental injuries. Preventive safety measures-eye protection in particular-and knowledge in dental first aid should be promoted among farriers and hoof care practitioners to decrease the frequency and severity of work-related injuries.

Keywords
accident prevention; dentoalveolar trauma; occupational safety; tooth injury;

Article Tools:
   Medline
   Email to me

Archives Highlights:
Sternal Abnormalities on Thoracic Radiographs of Dogs and Cats.
Sternal abnormalities were observed in 189/777 (24%) dogs and 53/183 (29%) cats, mostly around the intersternebral cartilages, accounting for 32/80 (40%) dogs and 20/35 (57%) cats. This was followed by an abnormal number of sternal segments (8% dogs, range 3-9 sternebrae; 15% cats, range 7-9 sternebra). Pectus excavatum was observed in 6/777 (0.8%) dogs and 6/183 (3%) cats, and pectus carinatum in 18/777 (2%) dogs and 2/183 (1%) cats.
Clinical and epidemiologic features of persons accessing emergency departments for dog and cat bite injuries in California (2005-2019).
The average annual incidence of dog bites was highest in children aged < 10 years and males, while that of cat bites was highest in adults aged ≥ 80 years and females. Both dog and cat bite injuries were more likely to occur to upper limbs. Bacteria were isolated from 3% of dog bite injuries and 21.5% of cat bite injuries at initial presentation.
Neoplasms in Domestic Ruminants and Swine: A Systematic Literature Review.
In all species, the most frequent neoplasms were squamous cell carcinomas in ruminants, while melanoma was the most frequent in swine.
Uroabdomen: Approach and Management
Animals with uroabdomen caused by small defects can potentially be medically managed with intravenous fluid therapy and urinary diversion (with a urinary catheter and/or abdominal drain). In a recent study, 25% of cats with uroabdomen were medically managed, and in another study, 14% of dogs were treated with medical management alone. Otherwise, uroabdomen is generally considered a surgical condition once the patient has been stabilized.
Risk factors for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture diagnosis and for clinical management in dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK.
After accounting for confounding factors, dogs aged 6 to less than 9 years, male neutered and female neutered dogs, insured dogs, and Rottweiler, Bichon Frise, and West Highland White terrier breeds, in particular, had increased odds of unilateral CCL rupture diagnosis. Insured dogs and dogs = 20 kg had increased odds of surgical management, while dogs = 9 years and dogs with one non-orthopaedic comorbidity at diagnosis with CCL rupture had reduced odds. These findings inform identification of at-risk dogs.

Back Print Save Bookmark in my Browser Email this article to me. Top of Page. VSPN AOW : Head and dental injuries ...
Contact Us