Front Page VSPN Message Boards Chat Library Continual Education Search MyVSPN - Coming Soon Help Frequently Asked Questions Send us Feedback! Go to VIN Industry Partners Go to VetQuest Go to Veterinary Partner Go to Y2Spay
 
Menu bar   Go to the VIN.com Portal
 

ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

Animals : an open access journal from MDPI
Volume 12 | Issue 5 (March 2022)

How Serious Are Health-Related Welfare Problems in Unowned Unsocialised Domestic Cats? A Study from Denmark Based on 598 Necropsies.

Animals (Basel). March 2022;12(5):.
Ida Sofie Thuesen1, Jørgen Steen Agerholm2, Helena Mejer3, Søren Saxmose Nielsen4, Peter Sandøe5
1 Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.; 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-2630 Tåstrup, Denmark.; 3 Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.; 4 Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.; 5 Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Abstract

Free ranging unsocialised domestic cats are widely believed to suffer from a high load of welfare problems. We assessed the validity of this belief by performing necropsies on the corpses of 598 unsocialised cats, originating from all parts of Denmark, that had been euthanised by two Danish cat welfare organisations. We selected a number of variables for health-related cat welfare that could be assessed through necropsy (e.g., gross lesions, ectoparasites and body condition) or by laboratory analysis (e.g., infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and by feline leukaemia virus (FeLV)). Each finding was classified as having either a major or minor welfare impact on the cat. More than 83% of the cats had no major finding, and 54% had no finding indicating a welfare issue at all. More than 83% of the cats had a body condition within normal range. Only 0.3% were emaciated. The most common finding was infestation with ectoparasites, with 15.9% infected with lice, 12.3% with fleas, 4.7% with ticks, and 6.7% with ear mites. FIV and FeLV were detected in 9.2% and 1.2% of the cases, respectively. The most common lesion related to the cats' teeth. Overall, unsocialised cats in Denmark have a moderate level of health-related welfare problems.

Keywords
FIV; FeLV; Felis catus; body condition; ectoparasite; free-ranging; necropsy; unsocialised;

Article Tools:
   Medline
   Email to me

Grants:
No grant number Dyrenes Dags Komité, QATO Fonden, Dyrenes Beskyttelse, Fonden Inges Kattehjem, Foreningen Kustos, Kattens Værn, Kitty og Viggo Freisleben Jensens Fond, and University of Copenhagen

Archives Highlights:
Managing Reproduction Emergencies in the Field: Part 1: Injuries in Stallions; Injury of the External Portion of the Reproductive Tract and Gestational Conditions in the Mare.
Priapism, paraphimosis, trauma to the scrotum and testicles, and penile injury are discussed. In mares, traumatic vestibular injury, placentitis, hydropsic conditions, prepubic tendon and abdominal wall compromise, and uterine torsion are included.
Cuterebriasis in Dogs and Cats
The typical manifestation of a bot infestation is a seeping, cutaneous nodule (furuncular lesion) that may be mistaken for an abscess. These lesions are most often found near the head, along the neck, or extending caudally along the shoulders, thorax, or sides.
Surgical repair of a full-thickness ear pinna defect in a horse
A 5-year-old gelding used for showing was presented for surgical repair of a full-thickness 15 mm diameter defect in the right pinna, which had occurred as a delayed complication following laser excision of a sarcoid.
Performing postmortem examinations on small animals in first-opinion practice
Postmortem examination (PME) is listed as a Day One Competence by the RCVS. The ability to perform a PME confidently in first-opinion practice may allow veterinarians to confirm their clinical diagnoses, and provides an opportunity for self education and quality control. Clear communication with the animal's owner and obtaining consent are essential before a PME is undertaken. Veterinarians should be aware of situations in which performing a PME may not be appropriate in first-opinion practice (eg, legal/forensic cases).
Survey of self-reported radiation safety practices among North American veterinary technicians involved in equine radiography using portable x-ray equipment.
Lead apron use was suboptimal, reported as "always" for 80.0% (104/130) of tube operators and 83.1% (123/148) of cassette holders. Approximately 20% of participants never wore thyroid shields, and approximately 90% never wore lead eyeglasses. Almost 50% of participants did not have lead eyeglasses available. Although > 55% of participants always held the x-ray equipment by hand, 58.4% (73/125) of tube operators and 25.0% (35/140) of cassette holders never wore gloves.

Back Print Save Bookmark in my Browser Email this article to me. Top of Page. VSPN AOW : How Serious Are Health-Re...
Contact Us