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ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

Journal of feline medicine and surgery
Volume 0 | Issue 0 (February 2022)

Serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease.

J Feline Med Surg. February 2022;0(0):1098612X221077017.
Jessica M Quimby1, Sarah K Lorbach2, Ashlie Saffire3, Amanda Kennedy4, Luke A Wittenburg5, Turi K Aarnes6, Karina J Creighton7, Sarah E Jones8, Rene E Paschall9, Emily M King10, Clara E Bruner11, Jessica N Wallinger12, Karen A van Haaften13
1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 3 Cats Only Veterinary Clinic, Columbus, OH, USA.; 4 Cats Only Veterinary Clinic, Columbus, OH, USA.; 5 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California - Davis, CA, USA.; 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 7 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 8 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 9 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 10 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 11 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 12 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.; 13 British Columbia SPCA, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:The purpose of this study was to assess serum concentrations of gabapentin in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) vs clinically healthy cats.
METHODS:Five healthy cats were enrolled in a pharmacokinetic study. A single 20 mg/kg dose of gabapentin was administered orally and blood was obtained at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 36 h via a jugular catheter. Serum gabapentin concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The same five healthy cats plus 25 cats with stable International Renal Interest Society stage 2 (n = 14) and 3 (n = 11) CKD were enrolled in a limited sampling study. Cats in both groups received a single 10 mg/kg dose of gabapentin, and serum gabapentin concentrations and compliance scores were obtained 3 and 8 h post-administration.
RESULTS:Cats with CKD had significantly higher dose-normalized serum gabapentin concentrations than normal cats at 3 h (P = 0.0012 CKD vs normal 10 mg/kg; P = 0.008 CKD vs normal 20 mg/kg) and 8 h (P <0.0001 CKD vs normal 10 mg/kg; P <0.0001 CKD vs normal 20 mg/kg). Both 3 and 8 h dose-normalized serum gabapentin concentrations were significantly correlated with serum creatinine (3 h: P = 0.03, r = 0.39; 8 h: P = 0.001, r = 0.57) and symmetric dimethylarginine (3 h: P = 0.03, r = 0.41; 8 h: P = 0.007, r = 0.48). There was a significant correlation between 3 h serum gabapentin concentrations and compliance scores (P = 0.0002, r = 0.68).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:Cats with CKD that received 10 mg/kg of gabapentin had significantly higher dose-normalized serum concentrations than normal cats that received 20 mg/kg, supporting the need to dose-reduce in this patient population.

Keywords
Anxiety; elimination rate; half-life; renal failure; stress;

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Grants:
K01 OD026526 OD NIH HHS

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