Nutrition for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses
Ann Wortinger, LVT, VTS (ECC)

VSPN Review by Kris Paige, BS, AAS, CVT Star
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This book could be of practical use in a veterinary practice, where the veterinary technicians are directly involved with discussing nutrition with the clients. It is organized into three sections: Basics of Nutrition, Nutritional Requirements of Dogs and Cats, and Feeding Management for Dogs and Cats.

Section One addresses basics of nutrition with each nutrient: water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins and amino acids, vitamins, and minerals being discussed in separate chapters with clear explanations of the need for each of these nutrients, as related to the entire diet. The calculations for estimating energy requirements of a particular animal are explained, and a comparison of results using the different formulae (exponents or linear) is done. I found the various charts and tables in this section clear and concise, especially when explaining the values of various food components. They could be well understood not only by the veterinary technician, but also by the client and would therefore be useful in discussions on pet nutrition. The information presented in these tables and charts is a condensed version of the more thorough, technical discussion found in the accompanying text.

Section Two which examines the nutritional requirements of dogs and cats, includes incisive descriptions of the regulation of pet food, the types of pet food, a discussion of the myths and perceived merits of a raw food diet, and guidance on assessing home-made diets. The review of the label information panel is excellent, with an included table of common pet food ingredients, examples of each, and their contribution to the diet (page 90). I found the author’s use, throughout the book, of these clear and compact tables to be a benefit, both in reiterating points discussed in the text, and as a potential reference when addressing a client’s nutritional questions. When a client is unfamilar to the technical terms used, presentation of selected tables may clarify the information.

The chapter on raw diet formulations explored the four major myths concerning raw vs. commercial diet as acontroversy and the reasoning disavowing each myth is explained well. The final paragraph of this chapter is important as it cautions against ostracizing the raw food proponent, and suggests various ways to come to at least a partial meeting of the minds, should the client be resistant to adopting a commercial diet for their pet. This chapter also mentions that a client using the raw food diet is to be regarded as a conscientious client and should be acknowledged as such throughout the course of dietary discussions.

Section Three, starts by describing various feeding regimens: free choice, time controlled, and portion controlled, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. It continues through an examination of body condition scoring (BCS), and while the pictorial tables use cats, there are tables for both the five point and nine point body condition score, that can be used for either cats or dogs. This section then separates each life stage for each animal and explains the energy requirements, stage-appropriate feeding and more importantly, how to feed for each life stage. Liberal use again of tables clarifies the text material. While there is repetition of information, the information is presented in different ways, to better facilitate discussion and understanding. This repetition is especially apparent in the latter part of this section, chapters 28-30, where the basics of nutrition for each species, myths about nutrition, and guidance on nutritional support are again presented. This gives the veterinary technician a second place to find any needed information. The index is satisfactory, including both table reference and discussion reference.

As a reference for basic discussion of nutrition and nutritional requirements, between the veterinarian or veterinary technician and the client, I see this as a useful investment to have in clinical practice.

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing (2007)

ISBN-13: 978-0-8138-2913-5


Table of Contents
Book Reviews
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Introduction
Alternative Medicine
Anatomy
Anesthesia/Analgesia
Animal Welfare
Aquatic/Fish
Avian
Behavior
Camelids
Canine
Cardiology
Client Education
Cytology / Hematology / Histology
Dental
Dermatology
Dictionary/Reference
Drugs/Pharmacology
Emergency Med
Endocrine
Epidemiology
Equine
Ethics
Exotics
Feline
Food Animals/Livestock
General
Genetics
Geriatrics
Handling & Restraint
Human-Animal Bond
Imaging & Radiology
Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Internal Medicine
Laboratory Medicine
Microbiology
Multimedia
Neurology
Nutrition
 
* Equine Nutrition 3rd Ed.
 
Anim. Nutr. Sci. (VSPN Review)
 
Cat: Behav. Nutr.
 
Clinical Procedures in Veterinary Nursing, 2nd Ed
 
Encyclopedia of Canine Clinical Nutrition
 
Encyclopedia of Feline Clinical Nutrition (VSPN)
 
Home-Prepared Dog & Cat Diets, 2nd Edition
 
Nutrition and Disease Management for Veterinary Technicians, 2nd Ed
 
You are hereNutrition for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses
 
Nutrition Vet. Tech.
 
Nutritional Management of Hospitalized Small Animals
 
Small Animal Clinical Nutrition, 5th ed (VSPN)
 
Small Animal Nutrition
 
* Recent Advances Nutrition 2004
Oncology
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Parasitology
Pathology
Pediatrics
Physiology
Physiotherapy
Practice Management
Primates
Rabbits, Rodents & Ferrets
Reproduction
Reptile/Amphibian
Research
Respiratory
Ruminants
Sheep/Goats
Shelter Medicine
Surgery
Swine
Technicians
Toxicology
Urology/Renal
Veterinary Education
Wildlife-Zoo Animals
Zoonoses

Date Published: January 2, 2013

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