Frequency of Dermatitis Associated with Presence of Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei in Stray Dogs in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico
World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2005
R.F. Colín; M.E. Bolio; M.D. Quintal; C.H. Sauri; N.A. Mis; E. Gutiérrez; A. Ortega; C. M. Acevedo.
Departamento de Medicina Interna y Cirugía. Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia. Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
México

The purpose of the study reported here was to estimate the frequency of skin diseases caused by Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei in stray dogs. A total of 70 stray dogs admitted to the city animal control facilities in Merida were used in the study. These dogs were sacrificed using humanitarian procedures following approved federal Mexican regulations (NOM-033-ZOO-1995). For diagnosis of skin lesions, skin biopsies from different anatomic sites were taken (direct smears and scraping). Biopsies were processed for diagnosis of dermatitis using standard histopathologic techniques (including use a 10% formaldehyde solution, paraffin, and HE staining techniques) ((Luna, 1964; Jubb, et al., 1993).

Examination of direct smears revealed that 15 (22%) dogs had presence of mites; 10 of the 15 dogs were classified as positive to Demodex canis, 3 to Sarcoptes scabiei, and 2 had both Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei. Scraping results revealed that 21 (30%) dogs had presence of mites; 11 of these were classified as positive to Demodex canis and 7 Sarcoptes scabiei. Finally, using skin biopsy procedures, 11 (16%) dogs had presence of mites; 6 of these were classified as positive to Demodex canis, 1 to Sarcoptes scabiei, and 4 toboth Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei. (Cordero del Campillo, et al., 1999; Muller, et al., 1991; Rodríguez-Vivas, et al., 2003).

To our knowledge, this is the first report on the frequency of skin lesions in stray dogs in the Peninsula of Yucatan. Analysis of study results reported here indicate that dermatitis is a frequent disease in stray dogs in the city of Merida. Small animal clinicians should be aware of the high frequency of skin lesions in stray dogs and help educate the public on the potential zoonotic implications of human exposure (contact) with stray dogs. In conclusion, analysis of study results reported here indicate that skin diseases caused by Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei are common in stray dogs. Small animal clinicians should be aware of the high frequency of skin diseases in stray dogs caused by Demodex canis and Sarcoptes scabiei and help educate the public on the potential zoonotic implications of human exposure (contact) with stray dogs.

REferences

1.  Cordero del Campillo, M., Rojo-Vázquez, F., Martínez-Fernández, A., Sánchez-Acedo, C., Quiroz-Romero, H., Carvalho, M. (1999). McGraw-Hill-Interamericana. Madrid, España.

2.  Jubb, K. V. F.; Kennedy, P. C.; Plamer, N. (1993). Pathology of Domestic Animals. Fourth Edition. Vol. 1

3.  Luna, L.G. (1964). Manual of staining methods. AFIP.

4.  Muller, G. H.; Kirk, R. W.; Scott, D. (1991). Dermatología en pequeños animales. 4ta. Edición. Ed. InterMédica.

5.  Rodríguez-Vivas R. I., Ortega-Pacheco A., Rosado-Aguilar J.A.,Bolio G. M. E.. (2003). "Factors affecting the prevalence of mange-mite infestations in strays dogs of Yucatan, Mexico". Vet. Parasitol. 115:61-65.

Speaker Information
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R.F. Colín


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