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ABSTRACT OF THE WEEK

The Journal of small animal practice
Volume 0 | Issue 0 (September 2017)

Urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England: prevalence and risk factors.

J Small Anim Pract. September 2017;0(0):.
D G O'Neill1, A Riddell2, D B Church3, L Owen4, D C Brodbelt5, J L Hall6
1 Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Herts, AL9 7TA, UK.; 2 Queen's Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB30ES, UK.; 3 Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Herts, AL9 7TA, UK.; 4 Queen's Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB30ES, UK.; 5 Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Herts, AL9 7TA, UK.; 6 Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, UK.
© 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:To estimate prevalence and demographic risk factors for urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England.
METHODS:The study population included all bitches within the VetCompass database from September 1, 2009 to July 7, 2013. Electronic patient records were searched for urinary incontinence cases and additional demographic and clinical information was extracted.
RESULTS:Of 100,397 bitches attending 119 clinics in England, an estimated 3108 were diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 3·14% (95% confidence intervals: 2·97 to 3·33). Medical therapy was prescribed to 45·6% cases. Predisposed breeds included the Irish setter (odds ratio: 8·09; 95% confidence intervals: 3·15 to 20·80; P< 0·001) and Dobermann (odds ratio: 7·98; 95% confidence intervals: 4·38 to 14·54; P< 0·001). Increased odds of a diagnosis of urinary incontinence were associated with: (1) weight at or above the mean adult bodyweight for the breed (odds ratio: 1·31; 95% confidence intervals: 1·12 to 1·54; P< 0·001), (2) age 9 to 12 years (odds ratio: 3·86; 95% confidence intervals: 2·86 to 5·20, P< 0·001), (3) neuter status (odds ratio: 2·23; 95% confidence intervals: 1·52 to 3·25, P< 0·001) and (4) being insured (odds ratio: 1·59; 95% confidence intervals: 1·34 to 1·88, P< 0·001).
CLINICAL IMPACT:Clinical Impact: Urinary incontinence affects just over 3% of bitches overall but affects more than 15% of bitches in high-risk breeds including the Irish setter, Dobermann, bearded collie, rough collie and Dalmatian. These results provide an evidence base for clinicians to enhance clinical recommendations on neutering and weight control, especially in high-risk breeds.

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